Timeless Tirades

Not a pretty picture

In the previous post in this series, I offered some background on the organization chart. How they came into being, and why their use has become so widespread. But for all their apparent utility, these diagrams remain deeply unpopular...

Beware the pyramid scheme

The key to succeeding in business is really quite simple. Ask your employees what they want…and then give it to them. But if this is true—that companies succeed by giving their employees what they want—why have so very few organizations (and managers) taken this simple message to heart..?

Give them an inch

The key to success in business is simple. Or at least it is according to the authors of The Enthusiastic Employee (2005). They conclude that any for-profit enterprise hoping to achieve some measure of commercial success should focus first and foremost on engaging their workers. And that means giving them what they want...

The right stuff

So what makes someone a good manager? Well, instead of trying to figure out what managers need to do to be considered “good,” let’s start with what organizations want or expect from their managers, and work backwards from there. In other words, what exactly are businesses looking for from management..?

The “one best way” (to manage)

In the last post in this series, I argued that our nation’s business school professors really don’t know what they’re talking about when it comes to managing. I based this claim on the weakness of contingency theory – an approach to managing that seems to represent the current state-of-the-art in management and organizational theory...

Why that MBA might not be worth as much as you think

In a previous series of posts (“Why you can throw out that management advice book – Parts 1,2&3”), I dismissed out-of-hand the advice of the mainstream management-advice literature. These texts are just too full of contradictions, inconsistencies, and paradoxes to...