Timeless Tirades

The “one best way” (to manage)

In the last post in this series, I argued that our nation’s business school professors really don’t know what they’re talking about when it comes to managing. I based this claim on the weakness of contingency theory – an approach to managing that seems to represent the current state-of-the-art in management and organizational theory...

Why that MBA might not be worth as much as you think

In a previous series of posts (“Why you can throw out that management advice book – Parts 1,2&3”), I dismissed out-of-hand the advice of the mainstream management-advice literature. These texts are just too full of contradictions, inconsistencies, and paradoxes...

“My door is always open”

In my last post in this series (“Managing: An art? Or a science..?”), I’d concluded that good management isn’t really about knowing what to do. It’s about knowing when to do it. Good managers, I argued, are those who seem to know when to make a particular decision for...

Managing: An art? Or a science..?

In my last post in this series, I argued that “good management” isn’t about knowing what to do. It’s about knowing when to do it. For instance, not much is to be gained by pointing out that managers need to be effective decision-makers. Nothing is perhaps more...

It’s not what you do. It’s when you do it.

Over the last few posts in this series, I’ve argued that anything and everything that management experts, gurus, and academics—and even managers and CEOs themselves—have to say about being a “good manager” suffers from precisely the same flaw. For each and every...

Is nothing sacred?

In a recent post, I argued that management advice books—like Good to Great, In Search of Excellence, or Who Moved My Cheese?—aren’t worth the paper they’re printed on. Why? Because they’re just too full of inconsistencies, contradictions, and paradoxes to be of much...