Unconventional (Mis)management Non-wisdom

Ignore that résumé?

For those of you familiar with my “Unconventional (mis)management non-wisdom” series of posts, you know that I devote each installment to some tried-and-true management principle, or pearl of management “wisdom.” Take the importance pre-screening applicants based on their résumé, for example – which is the subject of this week’s post...

Ignore your customers?

“Listen to your customers.” Of all the tried-and-true management principles that I’ve attempted to debunk, this might strike you as the most formidable. As you may recall, in other installments of my “Unconventional (mis)management wisdom” series of posts, I’ve found those who argue...

Micromanagement is good management?

If there’s one type of manager that is universally reviled throughout the business world, it’s the “micromanager.” Indeed, employees and managers alike have come to view micromanagement—which Merriam-Webster defines as managing with “excessive control or attention to detail”—as a singular evil...

Set an agenda?

Set an agenda, and stick to it. If you’ve ever had to run a meeting, you’ve probably gotten this advice. Doing so, you’re likely to have been assured, is absolutely critical to conducting an effective and efficient meeting...

Change is hard?

Change is hard. This is a frequent and perhaps well-worn sentiment amongst those who concern themselves with the management of for-profit enterprises. It’s corollary, of course, is that change is necessary – that in order for an organization to be successful, it must be open to, and willing to accept change...