Paradox of the Week – “Corner Office”

As some of you may know, on page two of the Business Section of the Sunday New York Times you’ll find a weekly feature called “Corner Office” written by Adam Bryant. For this edition in my “Paradox of the week” series of posts, a closer look at Mr. Bryant’s series... read more

Not a pretty picture

In the previous post in this series, I offered some background on the organization chart. How they came into being, and why their use has become so widespread. But for all their apparent utility, these diagrams remain deeply unpopular... read more

Ignore your customers?

“Listen to your customers.” Of all the tried-and-true management principles that I’ve attempted to debunk, this might strike you as the most formidable. As you may recall, in other installments of my “Unconventional (mis)management wisdom” series of posts, I’ve found those who argue... read more

Beware the pyramid scheme

The key to succeeding in business is really quite simple. Ask your employees what they want…and then give it to them. But if this is true—that companies succeed by giving their employees what they want—why have so very few organizations (and managers) taken this simple message to heart..? read more

Managers, what do YOU want..?

Hey, managers. I want to hear from you. That’s right. Instead of you putting up with what I have to say, this week I’d like to hear what's on your mind. And here’s what I want to know: What do you want..? read more

About the Blogger

David J. Rys is a former pharmaceutical scientist who first became interested in managing, and its malpractice, almost a decade ago, while sitting in a meeting. After an hour of listening to upper management tell him and his co-workers how to do their jobs better, he found himself wondering: why am I listening to you, when you should be listening to me? This blog reflects his efforts to answer this nagging question, as well as explain what “good management” really is, and why good managers are so few and far between ... read more
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